Employment

Map Key

Prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity

22 States & DC

Prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation only

1 State

Prohibit discrimination against public employees based on sexual orientation and gender identity

8 States

Prohibit discrimination against public employees based on sexual orientation only

2 States

The Federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is currently accepting complaints of sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination in employment based on Title VII’s prohibition against sex discrimination.

*State courts, commissions, agencies, or attorney general have interpreted the existing law to include some protection against discrimination against transgender individuals in Florida.

*North Carolina's executive order enumerates sexual orientation and gender identity. However, this order has a bathroom carve out for transgender employees making the executive order not fully-inclusive.

*On June 15, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia that sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination are prohibited under federal sex-based employment protections. Nevertheless, it is imperative that states continue enacting explicitly LGBTQ-inclusive
comprehensive non-discrimination laws since it will likely take additional litigation for Bostock to be fully applied to all sex-based protections under existing federal civil rights law. Moreover, federal law currently lacks sex-based protections in numerous key areas of life, including public spaces and services. Lastly, there are many invaluable benefits to states enacting inclusive protections even when they exist on higher levels of government.

For more information on the Supreme Court of the United States' decision in the Bostock vs. Clayton County case, see What the Supreme Court Ruling in Bostock Means For State Legislative Efforts.

Updated January 21, 2021