Press Room

press room
  • State Law Maps
  • Federal Legislation
  • Resources & Polling
  • Learn more about HRC

July 30, 2014

Category: Coming Out, State Advocacy, Alabama

HRC Alabama Unveils Results of Largest LGBT Survey in State’s History

Needs assessment shows LGBT Alabamians are contributing members of society and desire stronger communities.

7/30/2014

WASHINGTON—Today, the Human Rights Campaign’s (HRC) Project One America released key findings from a recent survey chronicling the daunting challenges faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Alabamians. The results show LGBT people are contributing members at home, the workplace, in school and within their faith communities. However, LGBT Alabamians enjoy no legal protections at either the local or state level. To address these disparities, Project One America will work to change hearts and minds, advance enduring legal protections, and build more inclusive institutions for LGBT people from the church pew to the workplace. The assessment—which is the largest of its kind to date-- is the impetus for creating HRC Alabama.

“The survey revealed LGBT Alabamians are just like their friends and family members--living, working, and volunteering in their communities,” said Project One America director Brad Clark. “However, they face harsh realities living in the state they call home. We have a moral responsibility to change that.”

In February and March of this year, HRC undertook a survey on the needs, experiences, and priorities of LGBT people in Alabama.  The survey shows LGBT Alabamians are participating members of their respective communities and don’t want to leave their homes. In fact, 61 percent of LGBT people participating in the study have called Alabama home for more than 20 years and 8 percent have served, or are serving, in the armed forces. Half of respondents volunteer in their communities and two-thirds donate money to charitable groups and nonprofits.

Raising families is also a core component in the lives of LGBT people. 67 percent of those surveyed ages 18-25 intend to have children one day. Alabama also has one of the highest rates of same sex couples raising children according to 2010 Census study by the Williams Institute.

Faith is another important part of so many lives of LGBT people. The study found 45 percent are people of faith; including 60% of African American people. Of those surveyed, 40 percent have donated money to their respective houses of worship.

“We know faith and strong families are essential values to the lives of LGBT people,” said Project One America Faith and Religion associate director Joseph Ward. “This survey clearly shows LGBT Alabamians and their families actively participate in their churches.”

Despite LGBT people embracing the state they call home, the survey also revealed they face some very harsh realities. The assessment determined 24 percent have experienced employment discrimination; 38 percent have experienced harassment at work; and 41 percent of LGBT households earning less than $45,000 experienced harassment at work.

HRC’s study also determined 38 percent have experienced harassment by members of their own family; 40 percent have experienced harassment in public establishments; 19 percent have experienced harassment from a public servant like a police officer or fire fighter; and 21 percent have experienced harassment monthly or more at their respective houses of worship. 

School is also a place where LGBT students face problems. The study found half have experienced harassment at school and 46 percent of respondents say harassment is common at the high school level.

In healthcare, 86 percent of Alabamians are insured according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. However, just 78 percent of LGBT respondents surveyed by HRC have health insurance and only 30 percent have access to partner benefits.

Respondents also listed their priorities-- prevent harassment and violence against LGBT people; reduce the stigma of HIV/AIDS and advance awareness of treatment and prevention; increase workplace protections; support LGBT youth in schools and their communities; and ensure LGBT families have the protections and dignity they deserve through marriage.

“Although LGBT Alabamians face challenges living in the communities they love, they remain committed to creating an environment that is safe and nurturing,” said Project One America deputy director Karin Quimby, “HRC Alabama will work across the state to advance enduring legal protections.”

The thorough needs assessment was conducted by Anzalone Liszt Grove through HRC’s membership and the LGBT communities in Alabama. 1148 people participated through email, social media, and online ads.

Click here to see digital brochure and view survey fact sheet.

Click here to learn more about HRC and Project One America.

 

The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is America’s largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality. HRC’s Project One America--an unprecedented effort to dramatically expand LGBT equality in the South through permanent campaigns in Mississippi, Alabama, and Arkansas—is generously supported by the HRC Foundation.

###

Tags: