HIV & HBCUs

College-age Black Americans are disproportionately affected by HIV.  The HBCU Program partners with HBCUs to provide administrators and students with information, strategies, and best practices aimed at significantly reducing student risk on campus. Last year, HRC released a new comprehensive guide for Historically Black College and University (HBCU) administrators, staff and students outlining many of the critical steps higher educational institutions can take to help achieve an HIV-free generation.

We are currently working to expand our engagements around HIV and HBCUs. 

Making HIV History

Making History + A Pragmatic Guide to Confronting HIV at Historically Black Colleges and Universities is a comprehensive guide for HBCU administrators, staff and students outlining many of the critical steps higher educational institutions can take to help achieve an HIV-free generation.

Despite declining HIV infection rates in the U.S., college-aged and Black Americans continue to be at a higher risk of acquiring HIV than the general population. In 2015, youth and young adults ages 13- to 24-years-old represented more than one in fivenew HIV diagnoses in America. Eighty percent of those diagnoses occurred in people ages 20- to 24-years-old. Among youth diagnosed with HIV in 2015, 55 percent were gay or bisexual Black men.

 

Download Making HIV History or flip through the digital version below.