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My Body

Embrace your body and your sexuality. Taking precautions against HIV doesn’t mean you should be ashamed of your sexuality or not enjoy sex - you can love your body and stay safe.

Sex Positivity

My Body is an HIV awareness and prevention campaign for Black and Latinx LGBTQ people between 16 and 35 years old that celebrates the beauty of our bodies while promoting sex positivity. With 1 in 4 LGBTQ young adults not receiving adequate education on HIV & AIDS, it’s our duty to teach our community that sex is nothing to be ashamed about and is a healthy, natural part of our lives.

Our Goal is to Empower Queer People with the Knowledge of:

My Body

Safe Sex Practices

It's more important than ever that LGBTQ people engaging in sex understand the importance of condom usage and prevention tools like Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP).

The Importance of Consent

It's imperative that as we talk about being sex positive we talk about consent. Sex must always be consensual with no violence and coercion.

How to Connect and Talk about Sex

The resources of the My Body campaign aims to ensure that those in our community are living and thriving by connecting you with the tips and tools you'll need to keep you and your partner healthy and safe.

My Body Campaign On the Move

Over the course of the next year, HRC will be partnering with LGBTQ activists, medical providers and public health experts to host community-based discussions focused on the lived experience of people living with HIV and those at risk for exposure. We're so proud to announce that as our first initiative to get sex positive and combat HIV, we received more than 1000 requests for free My Body boxes.

If you, missed our mass give away, don't free because this is only the beginning. Join the movement as we prepare to take My Body to new heights.

The Struggle is Real

There are more than 1.1 million people in the U.S. living with HIV, and approximately 40,000 people are diagnosed each year. The virus continues to disproportionately affect Black and Latinx gay and bisexual men, transgender women and Black women.

For more information on tips, education, testing facilities and resources visit our safe sex guide.