Today, marriage equality plaintiff Jim Obergefell took over HRC’s Twitter account to discuss the significance of presidential nominations to the Supreme Court and why Hillary Clinton is the best choice for the LGBTQ community.

After the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Windsor in 2013 struck down Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, longtime HRC member Jim Obergefell and his now late husband John Arthur filed a lawsuit to obtain legal recognition of their marriage by their home state of Ohio.

Jim, who fought for recognition of his marriage to John in Ohio so he could be listed on his death certificate, joined plaintiffs from Ohio and other Sixth Circuit states: Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. His co-plaintiffs included David Michener & William Herbert Ives and Robert Grunn (Obergefell v. Katich); Nicole Yorksmith & Pamela Yorksmith, Joseph J. Vitale & Robert Talmas, Brittani Henry & Brittni Rogers and Kelly Noe & Kelly McCraken (Henry v. Wymyslo); Gregory Bourke & Michael DeLeon, Randell Johnson & Paul Campion, Jimmy Meade & Luther Barlowe, Kimberly Franklin & Tamera Boyd (Bourke v. Beshear); Maurice Blanchard & Dominique James and Timothy Love & Lawrence Ysunza (Love v. Beshear); Joy "Johno" Espejo & Matthew Mansell, Kellie Miller & Vanessa DeVillez, Sergeant Ijpe DeKoe & Thomas Kostura, and Valeria Tanco & Sophia Jesty (Tanco v. Haslam); and April DeBoer & Jayne Rowse (DeBoer v. Snyder).

After Jim’s #HRCTwitterTakeover, join @HRC for a #turnOUT tweet up about why we must #turnOUT the pro-equality and how important the equality vote is on Election Day. The LGBTQ voting bloc will play a pivotal role in the presidential, senatorial and other down-ballot races.There are 9.4 million LGBTQ voters in the United States. Turnout among LGBTQ voters is also reliably high. This bloc was also a crucial piece of the puzzle for President Obama’s victory: in the last election, President Obama received 76 percent of all LGB votes, according to national exit polls. In total, roughly 6 million LGB voters cast a ballot in 2012 -- an election President Obama won by just under 5 million votes. Polling this year showed Secretary Clinton’s support among LGBTQ voters is running even higher than President Obama (for example, this May poll showing 84 percent). This mean that in key battleground states, LGBTQ people could make all the difference this election.


Filed under: Vote Equality, SCOTUS

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