HRC Blog

Why We Are Approving Referendum 74 in Washington State

Ref. 74 is an attempt to repeal the marriage equality law passed by the Washington state legislature and signed by Governor Gregoire.

In the past two weeks, many have contacted us with questions about Referendum 74’s language and why supporters of marriage equality need to approve the referendum.

The new law ended the exclusion of gay and lesbian couples from being able to get married. If the law is overturned, gay and lesbian couples would be prohibited from marrying. 

Sponsors of the referendum only need to collect 120,577 valid signatures by June 6 to get the measure on the November ballot. Then voters will be asked whether they approve of the law as passed by the legislature or whether they want to reject the law.  The language voters will see on ballots is:

The legislature passed Engrossed Substitute Senate Bill 6239 concerning marriage for same-sex couples, modified domestic-partnership law, and religious freedom [and voters have filed a sufficient referendum petition on this bill]. This bill would allow same-sex couples to marry, preserve domestic partnerships only for seniors, and preserve the right of clergy or religious organizations to refuse to perform, recognize, or accommodate any marriage ceremony.

Should this bill be:

           [X ] APPROVED       

          [ ] REJECTED

We have seven months to build the support needed to approve the marriage equality law.  Take the pledge today and ask your friends and family to do the same.

If you have questions about the referendum language or want to become involved with the campaign, please email Washington United Field Director Adrian.Matanza@hrc.org.

Paid for by the Human Rights Campaign, 1640 Rhode Island Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20036

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