HRC Blog

Memphis City Council to Vote on Employment Non-Discrimination Ordinance

This post comes from HRC Editorial and Digital Media Intern Leanne Naramore:

Tennessee’s equal rights advocates are fighting to protect all employees from discrimination.

The Memphis City Council will vote Tuesday on an employment non-discrimination ordinance for the city’s workers. Civil rights groups such as the Tennessee Equality Project (TEP) are battling to ensure the law is fully inclusive, regardless of whom you love or your gender identity and expression.

TEP urges Tennesseans to send this message to the Memphis City Council by calling or writing their office in advance of the Tuesday hearing:

“On Tuesday, Sep. 18, you have the chance to define Memphis as an inclusive community that believes in fairness and equality. Please vote to amend the employment non-discrimination ordinance to include the non-merit factors of age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression. City of Memphis employees deserve to wake up on Wednesday morning knowing that they are fully protected by an inclusive ordinance. City of Memphis employees like Virginia Awkward and Davin Clemmons deserve better than half-measures that weaken the proposed amendment or delayed adoption of full equality in our city. Stand firmly on the side of City of Memphis workers and vote for an LGBT-inclusive ordinance.”

Come show support for equal protection under the law at the 3rd Reading of the Memphis NDO at Memphis City Council, on Tuesday, Sept 18, 2012 at 125 North Main St.  Sign up here for more information and to attend!

comments powered by Disqus

Related Posts

ENDA Organizing Continues in the Midwest

We are Texans Together

Phone Banking for ENDA in Las Vegas

Groundbreaking Report Explores Barriers for LGBT Workers of Color

Chorus of Voices Against AZ Discrimination Bill Puts the Spotlight on Similar Bills in 8 States

What the Daily Beast Got Wrong About the Corporate Equality Index

Significant Changes on Tax Day for Same-Sex Couples After Victories at the Supreme Court