HRC Blog

Honduran LGBT Activists March for Justice

honduras flagPost submitted by Limor Finkel, Former HRC Global Engagement Program Coordinator

Yesterday, a group of LGBT activists in Honduras took to the streets. The crowd marched to the Attorney General’s office and demanded justice for the 22 people who have already been killed in 2013 in hate-crime related circumstances. Of the 117 hate-crime related deaths in the last few years, only 35 of them have been brought to court by the Honduran judicial system.

While it is not the first time Honduran LGBT activists have protested outside the Attorney General’s office, this demonstration comes only a few weeks away from the country’s elections set for November 24. This election is especially significant given that they are the first democratic election since the 2009 government coup. In the years since the coup, the Honduran LGBT community has faced increasing violence, most notably the violent murder of well-known LGBT activist Walter Trochez in 2009.

“We demand justice in the courts for our colleagues who have been murdered,” said José Zambrano, spokesperson for the Asociación por una Vida Mejor en Honduras (Association for a Better Life in Honduras). He went on to urge candidates in the upcoming election, especially those running for president, to include the LGBT community in their platform and political agenda, adding that they “are also Honduran citizens that exercise their right to vote.”

While countries like Argentina and Uruguay make progress towards achieving LGBT equality, state-sponsored homophobia and violence social attitudes towards the LGBT community are rampant in Central American and the Caribbean. In neighboring Jamaica a string of anti-LGBT violence has resulted in the beatings and death of several LGBT and gender nonconforming people. For more information regarding state-sponsored homophobia and the rights of LGBT people around the world, visit the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association’s world rights maps.

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