HRC Blog

Get Registered to Vote

Do you have an opinion about health care?  Are you concerned about how your tax dollars are being spent?  Can you choose which candidate will be most likely to act favorably on marriage equality?

On November 6, 2012, your voice can be heard!  But in order to make your voice count, you have to be registered to vote!  It’s time to be an active participant in your own government.  Please remember that this isn’t just about the much-publicized presidential election, but also all of your state and local offices as well.

The deadline to register and be eligible to vote in the November 6, 2012 General Election is Tuesday, October 9, 2012.  This can be either the postmark date or the date the application is received in the office of the voter registrar. You may, of course, register at any time before that date to ensure that your registration is effective for voting in November. You can obtain a voter registration application from your voter registrar's office, libraries, most post offices, or high schools.

There is a terrific website set up that can answer a lot of your basic questions about registering to vote, and about voting in the upcoming elections: http://www.votexas.org/faq

You can find your voter application here: https://webservices.sos.state.tx.us/vrapp/index.asp

Check to see if you are already registered by visiting: https://team1.sos.state.tx.us/voterws/viw/faces/SearchSelectionVoter.jsp

 

You may be asking why it is important that we register to vote by October and then actually get out to vote in November.  Here are just a few reasons why your voice is important and why it needs to be heard.

  1. Your opinions – Everyone has an opinion.  Everyone is entitled to their opinion.  And everyone’s opinion is important.  You don’t have to agree with your neighbor, but both of you have both the right and the responsibility to vote.
  2. Your concerns – What are you most concerned about – health care, job security, LGBT rights, the environment, education?  It doesn’t matter what your top priority is, make it a top priority to register to vote so that your voice counts!
  3. Your money – Make sure your local, state, and federal representatives know how much you want taken from your paycheck, and how you want your money spent once they’ve collected it.
  4. Your education – Did you know that local and state education board members are elected positions?  The decisions they make as well as those made at the higher levels filter down to your local school.
  5. Your job – So many aspects of our places of employment are affected by those individuals whom we elect.  Job training, minimum wage, fairness in hiring and firing practices, safety, and health insurance are all influenced by our elected officials.
  6. Your health – This one has been a huge topic for public debate lately.  Actions by elected state and federal officials have decided and will decide Medicaid, Medicare, and even private health care coverage.
  7. Your Social Security – These same officials decide how much payroll tax is collected, what the benefits of Social Security are, and which Medicare services will be provided and which will be paid for out of your own pocket.
  8. Your neighborhood – Crime prevention, law enforcement, city zoning, and public transportation are just a few of the departments that fall under the control of your local government officials.
  9. Your children – There is a Native American saying, “We do not inherit the Earth from our Ancestors; we borrow it from our Children.”  This is not only true for our environmental impact, but also for the nation we create on their behalf.

The process of voting isn’t about gender or religion, or sexual orientation or gender identity.  It doesn’t matter whether you are Republican or Democrat, man or woman, Christian or Buddhist, gay or straight.  Your voice has a right to be heard, but you have to make it happen.

Remember, the deadline to register and be eligible to vote in the November 6, 2012 General Election is Tuesday, October 9, 2012.  This can be either the postmark date or the date the application is received in the office of the voter registrar.

Voter registration applications are available from your voter registrar's office, libraries, most post offices, or high schools.

The first step is registering to vote and the second is to get out and vote!

 

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