Today marks National Black HIV & AIDS Awareness Day, an opportunity to focus our attention on the impact of HIV & AIDS on Black and African American communities in the United States.

“I’m hopeful that in my lifetime HIV will be a disease of the past,” Leslie Hall, a Black gay man who manages HRC’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Project, said. “I’m committed to raising awareness about HIV and encouraging young people on colleges and universities across the country -- especially HBCUs -- to take advantage of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and other proven prevention strategies. I know we will prevail.”

Fast Facts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

Prevention Challenges:

  • High Prevalence Rates: The comparatively large percentage of Black and African Americans living with HIV means that, as a group, we have a much greater chance of coming into contact with HIV, whether knowingly or not.
  • Socioeconomic Factors: Black and African Americans are more likely to be impoverished, which can mean limited access to quality and affordable healthcare and healthcare insurance, housing instability and high unemployment.  
  • Stigma and Discrimination: Many Black and African Americans delay getting tested or treated for HIV out of fear of stigma and discrimination.

Ways to Learn More and Get Involved:

HRC is committed to working with our allies, partners, members, and supporters to end the HIV epidemic and the stigma surrounding HIV. Click here to learn more, and join the conversation on social media using the hashtags #BeInTheKnow and #NBHAAD.


Don't miss a post

Sign up for RSS feeds

Have a news tip?

Share it with us

Community discussion

Read the guidelines